The Voice

DAVID ARCHULETA

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

By Guest Writer FenFan, “David Archuleta Tours Taiwan”

Posted by bebereader on Wednesday, August 10, 2016

ClsOAuQVAAEcESE.jpgsaffprdcredit: Shelley

Patience has paid off for fans of David Archuleta in Taiwan. After waiting 8 long years, they are finally going to see the guy they call Sunshine David perform in Taiwan from August 11 – 17, 2016. The tour, at the invitation of the LDS Church, will take him to seven cities around the island in as many days. 
Here’s the schedule, according to David Archuleta in Taiwan Facebook page:

10 August 10am     Press Conference, Jinhua Street Church in Taipei

11 August   7:30pm Forget Year, Know Music Concert, Taichung Seaport Art Center in Taichung

12 August 7:30pm     Love in the Family Concert, Tainan Cultural Center in Tainan

13 August 2pm            LDS Community Awards Ceremony and Concert, Jinhua Street Church in Taipei

14 August  2pm             Concert of Hymns and Chinese Music, Tzu Chi University Hall 8101 in Hualien

15 August 2pm               Appointment with Youth Concert, National Hsinchu Commercial and Vocational High School Stadium in Hsinchu

16 August  7:30pm          Hope, Love Public Benefit Concert, Chiayl City Culture Center Music Hall in Chiayi

17 August 7:30pm           Concert (Untitled), Kaohslung Labor Affairs Bureau 1st Floor Auditorium in Kaoslung

I googled some of the venues and found that the concert hall in Taichung seats 546 people. It is equipped with a proscenium stage and the building’s white roof is shaped like a bamboo hat. If the title of the concert here sounds a bit strange it’s because it’s a word for word translation of 忘 年 知 音 which I do not know how to translate into English! 忘 = forget, 年 = year or age, 知 = know, 音 = music or sound.

Taichung is in central Taiwan, just over a two-hour drive from Taipei.  From Taichung, David will head south to Tainan, about two hours by car.  He will perform at the Tainan Cultural Center which has a Performance Hall in a 3-storyed building.  The Hall has 1803 seats in a fan-shaped area. The Cultural Center also has what is called “The Native Theater International Hall” which seats 260.

Next, it’s back to Taipei for his performance at the LDS Community Awards at the LDS Temple in Jinhua Street.  The temple was the earliest  meeting place for Mormons in Taiwan.

Taiwan-Taipei-JUL-2010-004_slider1

After the Awards, David will head to Hualien, two and a half hours by train or 45 minutes by plane from Taipei, on the east coast of Taiwan.  David will be singing hymns at this Sunday performance at Tzu Chi University.  Tzu Chi U is a private university set up by the Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation and is well-known for its College of Medicine.  But I think this performance has nothing to do with the University and they are just using the facilities.

Midway through the tour, David will be in Hsinchu in northwestern Taiwan. Hsinchu, known as the Windy City, is home to six universities and many elementary, middle and high schools.  So it’s no wonder the concert here is billed as an “Appointment With Youth”.

After Hsinchu, David moves south again to Chiayi where he will perform at the Music Hall in the Chiayi City Culture Center which also has a museum and a library.  The Music Hall has 1113 seats.  It’s stage curtains were designed by Chinese master painter, Lin Wu-Shan.  They are made of hand-woven silk and satin and have a lotus pond theme.
 
According to the David Archuleta in Taiwan Facebook page, David will be the only performer in the Chiayi concert. Rumor has it that he will be singing a new song that he is currently recording, at this concert and at the next one in Kaohsiung. David’s performance in Kaohsiung will be the final one of this tour.  
 
 taiwanese-culture-secrets_025
Kaohsiung, in the south, is Taiwan’s largest port and second largest city. The Love River which runs through the city is a popular sight-seeing spot. Visitors can take long walks or cycle along the river banks or go water skiing. There are also lots of cafes, bars and restaurants on the river banks.
 Love River

I hope that despite his busy schedule, David can find time to see some sights and sample some of the delicious cuisine of Taiwan. First on the list – stinky tofu – smelly cubes of deep fried tofu, crispy on the outside and like soft custard on the inside, slathered with a sweet and spicy sauce. I don’t like it but I think David should take a bite just so he can say he’s had a taste of this iconic Taiwanese snack. He’ll just have to hold his nose while eating it.

stinky-tofu-646

If stinky tofu is not to his liking he can try some beef noodles, fish balls (not what you think! these are minced fish shaped into balls), braised or roast goose, suncakes or taiyang bing (crispy, crumbly pastries filled with honey or taro paste), oyster omelettes, lurou fan (five-spice braised pork spooned over rice), and san bei ji or three-cup chicken (so-called because the chicken is cooked in a cup each of oil, soy sauce and wine). I could go on and on but you get the drift. There’s lots to eat! Oh and before he goes home, he should buy some pineapple pastry as a food souvenir. These small pastries are made of candied pineapple wrapped in a buttery, crumbly pie crust.
 pineapple pastry
 All pictures found on Google Images except lead pic

Finally, if there is just one thing I hope David would do, it would be to sing a song in Mandarin. How about this one – The Moon Represents My Heart (Yuèliàng dàibiǎo wǒ de xīn) – a classic romantic ballad made popular by Teresa Teng, arguably the most famous Mandarin pop singer in the world at the time of her death in 1995.

 credit: qqqqq
PS  Some useful Mandarin phrases David could say or hear at his concerts.
– Hello: Nǐ hǎo
– Good evening: Wǎnshàng hǎo
– Thank you: Xièxiè
– Thank you for welcoming me to Taiwan: Xièxiè dàjiā huānyíng wǒ dào táiwān
– I love you: Wǒ ài nǐ  He might not want to say this but if he hears it he would at least know what they are yelling and he can reply xiexie!
– Sunshine David: 陽光 大衛 Yángguāng Dà wèi. This is the nickname that the Taiwanese have given him.

Posted in @DavidArchie, concerts, Food, music, Taiwan | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 159 Comments »

David Archuleta-Foodie!!!

Posted by djafan on Monday, July 13, 2015

I can’t believe it!  David was sooooo close to where I live, 10 minutes away!  Hubby and I actually discussed going!  But I have two granddaughters in allstar state softball championship and couldn’t go.  Maybe next year. 😄

This is a popular event with lots of food, all kinds!  Great for someone who is always hungry! lol

Posted in @DavidArchie, David Archuleta, Food, The Voice | Tagged: , , | 34 Comments »

David Archuleta and A Dash of Chile

Posted by bebereader on Thursday, June 7, 2012

Since David left for South America, I’ve been curious about the country he’ll be living in for the next two years. The Republic of Chile is one of South America‘s most prosperous countries. Located along the southwestern coast of  South America between Peru and Argentina, Chile stretches 2,653 miles long and only 109 miles wide.

But let’s put geography and history aside for now and focus out what’s really important. What are some of the traditional foods in Chile and what might Elder Archuleta be eating while on  his mission?

Chile is a multi-ethnic society and Chilean food is a combination of Spanish and Indian food with strong Italian, German, Croatian, French and Middle Eastern influences, truly a varied menu. Between two mountain ranges in Chile there is a valley where agriculture grows like olives, potatoes, pumpkin and maize.

One of the highlights of Chilean cuisine is it’s seafood. The list of seafood in Chile seems endless with tuna, squid, sole and salmon in abundance.  Lobsters are freely available as are oysters and eels.

David Archuleta ‏@DavidArchie
From David: Having cocimiento (some kind of broth with pollo, chuleta, y mariscos) for my first time. (thought u would like a food tweet ks)

What is cocimiento?

Cocimiento – Chicken, pork, seafood (with shell) and vegetables are sautéed in a pan to which potatoes in skins are added and cooked for about an hour. Wine is added to this and steamed over low heat for another hour creating a poultry, pork and seafood stew.

Has Elder Archuleta tried any of these other traditional Chilean dishes?

Caldillo de Congrio is another dish similar to cocimiento but it contains only seafood; no chicken or pork. It’s a stew made with eel, onions, potatoes and carrots.  Eels can be difficult to find outside of Chile so any firm white fish is acceptable. Eel is usually deep fried in Chile or served steaming hot in a clay dish, with some mussels and clams.

Care for some deep fried eel?

Empanadas (little pies or turnovers with filling) are popular in all of Latin America, either fried or baked. I’ve had them here in the states from an Argentinean bakery and they are delicious. They’re also handy to take on picnics or for a quick lunch or snack. Empanada de Pino is the traditional empanada in Chile, filled with ground meat, onions, olives and raisins and then baked in an oven. Sometimes slices of hard boiled eggs are inside them, too.

Ensalada a la Chilena is a very simple salad using sliced ripe tomatoes and thinly sliced onions with an oil dressing. The term “salad” in Chile is a generic term for any fresh vegetable, raw or cooked, served cold as an accompaniment to a meal. Because it goes with any meal, salad is a staple on every Chilean table.

Humitas are mashed seasoned corn wrapped in cornhusks and then steamed.  They are a traditional Chilean dish that resemble tamales from Mexico. The corn used in Chile is called choclo and isn’t very sweet. Where tamales or other countries’ versions are often spicy, Chilean humitas are very basic and plain. Humitas are served in the corn husk. Sometimes the humita is still wrapped tightly with some string that was used to hold it together for cooking. To eat the humita, untie the string and unwrap the husk. Don’t eat the corn husk! Humitas are typically served with the tomato and onion Chilean salad.

Parrillada is similar to a barbeque in the U.S., using different kinds of meat, sausages and poultry, cooked slowly over charcoal. It’s served with potatoes, salad or rice. Commonly served with Pebre, a Chilean spicy herbal sauce made from chopped onions, coriander, extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic and ground chili  peppers.  Pebre must be scooped up with a spoon, so as not to lose the taste of any of the ingredients.

Pastel de Choclo is a casserole made with beef,  sautéed with onions, chicken and olives, pieces of hard boiled eggs and ground corn, and then baked to make this beloved comfort food that is usually eaten in the summer.

I found mucho delicioso Chilean desserts of which I hope Elder Archuleta will partake. The Germans and Austrians brought tasty dessert treats with them when they migrated to the south of Chile in the nineteenth century.

Kuchen is a fluffy fruit flan pie of German origin, similar to a cheese cake but lighter and not as rich.

Leche Asada is milk flan or baked custard.

Chilean-style sopaipillas are deep-fried round pumpkin fritters drenched in a brown sugar syrup.  Sold throughout the country by street vendors, they are usually served for breakfast, piping hot with coffee. They typically  measure 4-inches wide, although many restaurants now serve smaller 2-inch versions.

Next installment: Music in Chile


Posted in Chile, David Archuleta, Food, The Voice | Tagged: , , , , , | 72 Comments »

 
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