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DAVID ARCHULETA

Posts Tagged ‘empanadas’

Saying Goodbye To Chile ~ David Archuleta

Posted by bebereader on Friday, February 21, 2014

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I’m convinced that time will pass more quickly if I would only stop watching the calendar and counting down the days until David comes home. It’s kind of like a pot of water that won’t boil if you keep watching it. Yet I still wonder how he might be feeling as he finishes up his time in Chile, his home for the last two years. The reality is that I cannot make any assumptions nor can I imagine how he feels about saying goodbye to Chile.

However, I do believe that you leave a little piece of yourself wherever you visit. Perhaps there will always be a part of him that will remain in Chile, the part that came to life with every gorgeous sunset he witnessed, every glance he took at the Andes Mountains, every bite he took of the fresh-baked pastries and with every person he encountered along his journey during his mission, some who may have very few physical possessions yet are full of joy and grace.

I couldn’t be happier that the wait is almost over but I realize that it’s sort of a goodbye for me, too. How is it possible to love a foreign country that I never visited except by doing research online to write articles for this site? For me, chili had always been a delicious beef dish, eaten during the winter. Chilly was always a reason to put on double layers of clothing.

Through David, the country, C H I L E came to life for me, instead of just being a speck on the world map. In addition to his beautiful voice, everlasting friendships and computer skills, I have David to thank for yet another thing, for opening my eyes to this beautiful country with its historical sites, extensive landscape of mountains, volcanoes, rainforests, glaciers, deserts, waterfalls, beaches, lakes, rivers, forests and islands.

It’s not just the countryside that I admire; it’s also the people, who are passionate and fun-loving. I’ve even become fond of their music after doing some research on what’s playing on their airwaves. I picked up a few songs for my Ipod; Alberto Plaza’s “Bandito”and “Amiga” by Alexander Acha. But that’s not all. I found a little Argentenian bakery not too far away that makes the most delicious empanadas. If I ever get the chance to visit South America, Chile would be my first stop.

Soon, David’s time spent in Chile will become part of his past. He will be busy with all sorts of plans for new music, touring, family, friends, catching up with fans and going out for Pad Thai. If he feels sad about saying goodbye to Chile and the people he met there, I hope he also feels content that he made a difference in their lives.  He has certainly made a difference in ours.

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Posted in @DavidArchie, David Archuleta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 78 Comments »

David Archuleta and A Dash of Chile

Posted by bebereader on Thursday, June 7, 2012

Since David left for South America, I’ve been curious about the country he’ll be living in for the next two years. The Republic of Chile is one of South America‘s most prosperous countries. Located along the southwestern coast of  South America between Peru and Argentina, Chile stretches 2,653 miles long and only 109 miles wide.

But let’s put geography and history aside for now and focus out what’s really important. What are some of the traditional foods in Chile and what might Elder Archuleta be eating while on  his mission?

Chile is a multi-ethnic society and Chilean food is a combination of Spanish and Indian food with strong Italian, German, Croatian, French and Middle Eastern influences, truly a varied menu. Between two mountain ranges in Chile there is a valley where agriculture grows like olives, potatoes, pumpkin and maize.

One of the highlights of Chilean cuisine is it’s seafood. The list of seafood in Chile seems endless with tuna, squid, sole and salmon in abundance.  Lobsters are freely available as are oysters and eels.

David Archuleta ‏@DavidArchie
From David: Having cocimiento (some kind of broth with pollo, chuleta, y mariscos) for my first time. (thought u would like a food tweet ks)

What is cocimiento?

Cocimiento – Chicken, pork, seafood (with shell) and vegetables are sautéed in a pan to which potatoes in skins are added and cooked for about an hour. Wine is added to this and steamed over low heat for another hour creating a poultry, pork and seafood stew.

Has Elder Archuleta tried any of these other traditional Chilean dishes?

Caldillo de Congrio is another dish similar to cocimiento but it contains only seafood; no chicken or pork. It’s a stew made with eel, onions, potatoes and carrots.  Eels can be difficult to find outside of Chile so any firm white fish is acceptable. Eel is usually deep fried in Chile or served steaming hot in a clay dish, with some mussels and clams.

Care for some deep fried eel?

Empanadas (little pies or turnovers with filling) are popular in all of Latin America, either fried or baked. I’ve had them here in the states from an Argentinean bakery and they are delicious. They’re also handy to take on picnics or for a quick lunch or snack. Empanada de Pino is the traditional empanada in Chile, filled with ground meat, onions, olives and raisins and then baked in an oven. Sometimes slices of hard boiled eggs are inside them, too.

Ensalada a la Chilena is a very simple salad using sliced ripe tomatoes and thinly sliced onions with an oil dressing. The term “salad” in Chile is a generic term for any fresh vegetable, raw or cooked, served cold as an accompaniment to a meal. Because it goes with any meal, salad is a staple on every Chilean table.

Humitas are mashed seasoned corn wrapped in cornhusks and then steamed.  They are a traditional Chilean dish that resemble tamales from Mexico. The corn used in Chile is called choclo and isn’t very sweet. Where tamales or other countries’ versions are often spicy, Chilean humitas are very basic and plain. Humitas are served in the corn husk. Sometimes the humita is still wrapped tightly with some string that was used to hold it together for cooking. To eat the humita, untie the string and unwrap the husk. Don’t eat the corn husk! Humitas are typically served with the tomato and onion Chilean salad.

Parrillada is similar to a barbeque in the U.S., using different kinds of meat, sausages and poultry, cooked slowly over charcoal. It’s served with potatoes, salad or rice. Commonly served with Pebre, a Chilean spicy herbal sauce made from chopped onions, coriander, extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic and ground chili  peppers.  Pebre must be scooped up with a spoon, so as not to lose the taste of any of the ingredients.

Pastel de Choclo is a casserole made with beef,  sautéed with onions, chicken and olives, pieces of hard boiled eggs and ground corn, and then baked to make this beloved comfort food that is usually eaten in the summer.

I found mucho delicioso Chilean desserts of which I hope Elder Archuleta will partake. The Germans and Austrians brought tasty dessert treats with them when they migrated to the south of Chile in the nineteenth century.

Kuchen is a fluffy fruit flan pie of German origin, similar to a cheese cake but lighter and not as rich.

Leche Asada is milk flan or baked custard.

Chilean-style sopaipillas are deep-fried round pumpkin fritters drenched in a brown sugar syrup.  Sold throughout the country by street vendors, they are usually served for breakfast, piping hot with coffee. They typically  measure 4-inches wide, although many restaurants now serve smaller 2-inch versions.

Next installment: Music in Chile


Posted in Chile, David Archuleta, Food, The Voice | Tagged: , , , , , | 72 Comments »

 
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