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DAVID ARCHULETA

Archive for the ‘Respect’ Category

Respecting the Influence of David Archuleta ~ Something to Think and be Thankful ‘Bout

Posted by Abrra on Thursday, November 22, 2012

It was a sunny Sunday morning ride to do a favor for an out of town friend. I had to feed her cats. As usual my iPod was hooked into the car stereo and “Something ‘Bout Love” was playing. Pulling up to the stoplight, I was first in line to go when it changed to green.

There’s something ’bout love that breaks your heart
Woah, oh, oh, oh
It sets you free
There’s something ’bout love that tears you up
Woah, oh, oh, oh
You still believe

A man was standing on the grassy island that separates the traffic coming to the stoplight at this busy intersection. He was simply dressed in a white long sleeve jersey and dark colored sweat pants. A baseball cap shaded his head from the sun. The most remarkable thing about him was that he held a sign. I was not sure why he was there until I read the sign.

It said, Homeless. Anything will help out. Thank you.

The skeptic side of me wanted to dismiss this scene and not look at the man. My heart told me to look him in the eye. It’s amazing how a few seconds spent sizing up a man holding a sign will soften your resolve to just drive past him. Did I believe that this man was motivated by self interest? You bet I did. If no one was going to hand him a place to live, he was going to do everything in his power to get by, including standing on a street begging for money. I can respect that. Did I consider that he might be an addict looking to pay for his next fix? I did. I can’t even imagine the pain that an addict feels, when in need of a fix. I decided not to press him for details on what brought him to this place in his life. Secretly, I hoped he would make the most out of what donations he got on this day. Maybe enough for a warm bed and a hot meal. The offer of a job, rather than a handout of cash, would surely help his situation most of all.

When the world falls down like rain
It’ll bring you to your knees
Something ’bout love that breaks your heart
Woah, oh, oh, oh
But don’t give up
There’s something ’bout love

Why do I bring this up now, you ask? I want to highlight the fact that no matter how comfortable we are in our lives, there are still so many others who struggle each day for a meal and a bed to sleep on. There are reasons why folks find themselves in dire need such as job loss or unexpected illness that can wipe out a family’s resources. I am inspired by David’s example of giving to those in need. There are organizations in every state that serve the homeless. Their budgets have been cut to the bone, making it difficult to maintain programs for the poor. Getting involved by volunteering and donating at food banks and shelters would serve this need so well. To get information on what you can do locally go here:

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/topics/homelessness

Your day will come
The past is gone
So take your time
Live and let live

I had a brief exchange with the man who stood on the grass holding his sign. He thanked me in a soft voice. When the light changed to green, I was on my way again. David sang “I won’t shed a tear, just as long as you stand by me.” It doesn’t happen too often, but I had tears in my eyes. For the man who had to resort to standing on the street to beg for money to live just another day in paradise.

Original photo by canadianarchie

Posted in David Archuleta, Respect, The Voice | Tagged: , , , | 103 Comments »

David Archuleta ~ Crossing The Bridge

Posted by MT on Saturday, June 30, 2012

There is no finite line between childhood and adulthood. No one can pinpoint the exact moment in time that he or she becomes an adult. It is a blurred line that takes some time to cross, like a bridge over a river that one must cross carefully with slow, measured steps.

For some celebrities, that bridge is crossed by going out in public and drinking, doing drugs, or making spectacles of themselves in an effort to show the world that they are no longer children and are taking part in “grown up” activities. But no matter how hard they try, they can’t shake the world’s opinion that they are still children. The world simply sees them as unruly children. This method of making the transition is also very unhealthy for the celebrity.

Hmmm … perhaps time out of the public’s view is a better answer. As fans, we have watched David grow and can easily see the difference between the young person David was and the man David is today. But like many others, he still has some growing/maturing to do in order to leave the teen label behind and be seen as an adult. So, at what point in time can he definitively say he is now a full-fledged adult? There is no easy answer to that question.

David leaving for two years to go on a mission is not something that most fans are happy about. While his reasons are understandable and we readily agree that we accept it as something he needs to do for himself, he is greatly missed. David spreads joy in a way that few others can. Actually, I’ve never known anyone else who could bring so much happiness to so many with just a smile, a laugh, or a song. And yet, he does it so easily just by being himself.

But, although we miss him, I can’t help but think that this time might be the bridge that David needs in order to cross from “adolescent David” to “adult David” in the world’s view without having to resort to any of the nonsense that some celebrities feel the need to partake in. These two years will give him the gift of time and allow his growth and maturity to be real, not something manufactured in an effort to gain the attention and acceptance of a disinterested public. His mission work will give him a knowledge and maturity that comes from serving others. And it will allow him to cross his bridge in relative anonymity, emerging as a man who is ready to bring that new maturity to his music and his performances, a man ready to take on the music industry.

Without having seen him in over two years, the world will be taking a “fresh” look at the new David Archuleta. It could be just what he needs to remove that blurred line, making it a clean and clear transition. Returning with a new maturity at age 23 should make it easier for the world to see and accept that he is no longer a “teen star” and that it’s time to take him seriously, time for him to be treated with the respect that his tremendous talent deserves.

Posted in David Archuleta, Editorial, Personal freedom, Respect, The Voice | Tagged: , , , | 127 Comments »

Loss and Redemption ~ David Archuleta

Posted by FunnyGirl on Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Dear Friends,

Some of you know about what happened with my older son, but most of you do not. None of this was David related until he announced the mission. It was then that a cycle of pain and loss restarted in my heart, and now, after many weeks of processing it all, I felt compelled to share it, with the hope that it may help someone.

My oldest child, now age 12, was diagnosed with Autism at the age of two-and-a-half. He was a healthy baby and was developing normally until 16 months, when he received 4 vaccinations during a routine office visit. Within one week of that day he lost all his words, eye contact, and started to have severe bowel issues. I am not trying to start a debate about vaccines, I am just telling you what happened to my child. Thus began our journey into the pit of despair and heartache. Several doctors, tests, and hours of research later we began to understand what we could do to begin to try to heal his physical and sensory problems.

The first step was special education preschool. The district here that diagnosed him told us that he would never speak, dress himself, never be able to live alone or have a relationship. We were told to start looking into long-term care options. Words cannot describe the loss and devastation that we felt. I’ll never forget the first day of preschool. I had to take him there; I just couldn’t let him take the school bus; he just looked so tiny. I dropped him off, both of us sobbing. The teacher had to block the door to keep him from getting out. I went out to my car and cried and cried and cried. I didn’t want to take him there. He was supposed to be home with me. Did he know I was coming back for him? Did he understand what I told him about school and that it would help him? Would it even help him? I trusted no one. Who were they to tell me what my child’s future would be? I sat there in the parking lot in my car sobbing. When I finally went in to get him I was so relieved. He seemed fine. The thought of doing it again the next day was too much to think about.

His preschool day was two-and-a-half hours every morning. The longest two-and-a-half hours you could ever imagine. In the meantime we were working on special diets, vitamins, sensory therapy and lab tests to help with the bowel issues. I thanked God for credit cards and that we were able to get high credit limits. Everything we tried with him was very successful and immediate. We did everything outside of mainstream medicine with the help of a doctor who I know is an angel. We went through about 15 doctors before we found her. The preschool was awesome, and it truly was needed to help him catch up on things he had missed. But having him gone everyday, even though it was just the half day, was very depressing. It was a true loss. Then after preschool would come elementary school. I would never get those preschool years back.

I never did get those years back. But what I did get was something even greater. Our son began to speak again. He began to interact with us. He was able to handle sensory input. He has been in a regular classroom setting since Kindergarten. He continued with speech therapy through 3rd grade. He was able to stop the special diet after 5 years. He is now in 7th grade and has all A’s in school. He scored within his grade level on the MEAP test two years in a row now. He has friends, sleepovers, normal relationships and is an awesome big brother.

Over time I began to accept that this journey with my son was somehow meant to be. I ended up working at the sensory clinic that helped him so much. I was able to talk to and give hope to thousands of parents. I was able to work with the children and see them progress. I have been witness to the restoration of my son’s health and well-being. I have come from the depths of despair to the triumph of redemption.

When David announced his mission I was in shock. The next morning I cried for six hours. I had not cried like that since that morning at preschool. All the feelings of loss and fairness and right and wrong and why and how came rushing back. I was losing my baby again. I know he’s not a baby, and he’s not mine, but you all know and understand that is exactly what it feels like. Much like taking my son to that preschool, this was something that had to be done despite how I felt about it. It was going to happen, and all my tears and frustration were no match for it. I came to accept that just as I took my son and handed him over to strangers, I had to support David in his choice because what is best for me is not necessarily the best for him. I could have not sent my son to preschool and kept him home with me. But I had to do what was best for him, despite my own pain.

For those of you that have not experienced a loss, and even for those who have, David’s leaving is devastating. The routine and activities of the last 4 years will change. We will have to find a new normal. And we will. Nothing will stop what is meant to be for David. We must be strong and have faith that the future will bring nothing but the best of times for all of us. My journey with my son taught me that even though things seem impossible you can never give up hope.

We cannot get back the two years that he will be away. What we can do is be here to support one another, buy whatever music comes out, and take good care of the love we have in our hearts for him. One by one we were chosen to be on this journey, for reasons we may never know. His voice took root in our hearts. His spirit made our own start to blossom. Now we must tend to the garden while he is away.

Photo credit mzdinolatino

Posted in David Archuleta, Respect, The Voice | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 71 Comments »

David Archuleta ~ MKOC Tour ~ The California Leg ~1st up Santa Rosa & Los Angeles

Posted by djafan on Tuesday, December 13, 2011

credit Heather Farble

The My Kind of Christmas Tour hits the west coast today for a series of four concerts. Tonight David will blow everyone’s socks off in Santa Rosa at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts!

SANTA ROSA-Wells Fargo Center For The Arts

Tomorrow, Club Nokia in Los Angeles will be treated to his awesomeness.

LOS ANGELES – Club Nokia

Posted in Appreciation, Art, artistic freedom, concerts, David Archuleta, jazz, lyrics, music, Musical icon, My Kind of Christmas Tour, performance art, Personal freedom, Respect, tours, Uncategorized | 158 Comments »

David Archuleta ~ Little Things Matter Most

Posted by bebereader on Wednesday, August 3, 2011

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
~Maya Angelou~

There was no mistake made when David was named. The name David means “beloved.” It’s the little things David does that make him so endearing to us. He points at a lucky someone in the audience when he sings “I’m just a little too not over you” and we all squeal. Then he waves at her because it’s not polite to point. He makes a concerted effort to acknowledge us, to let us know that we’re important to him. The little things he does do not go unnoticed.

When he’s at a mall appearance, he looks up and waves to those at the top level, and at his concerts, he always asks, “How’re you guys doing in the back?” In Ho Chi Minh City, he allowed fans onstage at the end of the show to give him flowers. Worried about pushing in the mosh, he often gestures with his hand to move back. Who does this? These are some of the little things David does. He genuinely cares about us.

He talks to fans during soundcheck and smiles as he listens to them sing his songs to him; he walks through a chaotic airport with a smile on his face, while hundreds are screaming, anxiously waiting to catch a glimpse of him. He tells us that he is no better than us, that if we have a dream we should go for it. He makes us want to emulate him, to be more like him.

When on tour, he stays up late until he opens every one of our gifts and often, when given a return addressed envelope, sends back a hand-written thank you note. He high-fives a line of fans who have waited in the heat to see him, even though he is pressed for time. When asked to take a picture, he says ‘Why not?’ while his handlers urge him that it’s time to go. He makes us feel important. In Hanoi he gestured with his hand to let the guard know it was okay, that he didn’t have to remove the fan who came onstage to wipe his brow.  A gentle leader, who inspires gentle acts of kindness in others.

And the list goes on…at home, the elderly woman whose leaves he raked, the stealth performances he gives at nursing homes, the countless hospitals he visits. On the road, the elderly fans he gets up from his seat at busy autograph signings to give a hug to, the humble thanks for gifts, the embracing of traditional garb, and all the impromptu serenades of Happy Birthday.  Always, the vlogs, the twitter parties, the penetrating eye contact and the way he lets us hold his hand or give him a hug when we meet him. The unfailing empathy and compassion he shows to one and all.  Is this guy for realz?

Big things are important but more often it’s the little things that have the greatest impact.

“It is not the size of our actions but the amount of love and care that is put into them that matters.”  
~Mother Teresa~

It’s these little things David repeatedly does that reveal his character and how much he cares about his fans.  Little wonder the feeling is so mutual.

Posted in Appreciation, David Archuleta, fandom, Respect, role models | Tagged: , , | 135 Comments »

 
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